Ancient plumbing keeps China’s Forbidden City dry

Constructed in the Ming Dynasty 600 years ago, the Forbidden City exemplifies traditional Chinese architecture with a structure that is "high north, low south," preventing flooding.

This summer has seen China's worst flood season in nearly two decades. More than 200 people have been killed, and hundred of thousands have been forced to leave their homes.

As heavy rains hit Beijing last week, the Forbidden City was one of the few places that remained relatively dry – and open to the public. According to the state-run China Daily, 30,000 people visited the complex even as many other places in the city shut down.

Constructed in the Ming Dynasty 600 years ago, the Forbidden City exemplifies traditional Chinese architecture with a structure that is "high north, low south," preventing flooding.

Throughout the complex are a number of drainage points carved to look like dragons. The palace also has a complex sewage system where the water flow is dispersed, preventing overflows.

More details here.

Source: Shanghaiist.

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